Climate Science Communicator Supports Our Cause

Climate Nuremberg Testimonials

Over at the Climate Nuremberg blog (run by a blogger with the nom-de-death of Brad P. Keyes), they have wished death on much of their audience.  The motto of this site is “When what you really need is some sort of Climate Nuremberg.”  Mind you, Brad is a self-described “science communicator” whatever that means.  My guess, however, is that he’s quite a few notches below Carl Zimmer, for example.

This caught our attention:

Communication Dilemmas #1: Wishing Death on People Without Losing Them

Part of being a science communicator is hoping a natural disaster kills as many members of the audience as possible, as soon as possible, with as much media exposure as possible. As a communicator myself, I’d like nothing better than for thousands of middle-class white people to die in an extreme weather event—preferably one with global warming’s fingerprints on it—live on cable news. Tomorrow.

The hardest thing about communicating the deadliness of the climate problem is that it isn’t killing anyone. And just between us, let’s be honest: the average member of the public is a bit (how can I put it politely?) of a moron. It’s all well and good for the science to tell us global warming is more dangerous than Nazism, but Joe Q. Flyover doesn’t understand science. He wants evidence.

So we’ve probably reached the limits of what science communication can achieve. At this point only nature herself can close the consensus gap—or the fear gap.

Cognitive scientist C. R. R. Kampen thinks the annihilation of a city of 150,000 people might just provide the teaching moment we need …

Amen, brother!  The sooner we rid this planet of the pestilence called the human race, the better off everyone will be.  Especially the cockroaches and crows.

Brad doesn’t want to give his real last name because then we could actually verify his credentials.  Far easier to call for the deaths of thousands behind the shield of anonymity.  FYI his Twitter handle is @BradPKeyes.

 

Recommended Reading

Comments Icon3 comments found on “Climate Science Communicator Supports Our Cause

  1. Hey PFPFP,

    Brad here (chief blogger at Climate Nuremberg).

    I notice you haven’t been posting recently. That’s a real shame because I always admired this blog for its no-nonsense, hard line stances on environmental catastrophes like the population problem. OK, I’ll admit it: PFPFP was one of the main inspirations for, and creative influences on, Climate Nuremberg. In a world of smart-alecky irony and sardonicness, I knew I could look to you guys to lead the way in old-fashioned earnest, non-sarcastic, tongue-firmly-out-of-cheek eco-journalism.

    What happened to the dream?

    Please reach out to me. As a kindred spirit, it would mean so much to hear from you, even if it’s just to know you’re alive and well and carrying on the good fight elsewhere.

    1. Brad, thanks for the kind words. We have another hosting company for our non-parody blogs. Over the last two months those sites have been hit with repeated malware intrusions. That plus work has kept me from my usual level of snark. I have had good intentions and several stories have crossed my path. I hope to be back here full bore [sic] soon.

      Naturally, I encourage your efforts. If you’d like to submit some stuff to pfpfp, please let me know.

      1. Does this mean you’d give serious consideration to a guest article submitted by someone as many “notches below Carl Zimmer” as I? How magnanimous! 😀 Hehe… nah, just joshing you. Don’t be fooled by my false modesty: I’m so many notches above Carl Zimmer that I don’t even know who Carl Zimmer, BA (English) is.

        Now that you mention it, I do have the embryo of an article on the evils of population on my computer, but I wonder where I should post it that would reach the most people and thereby do the most good. My own once-humble, now-arrogant blog gets double-digit traffic on a good day, so I’d have to be sure I was giving the story away to an even better-read blog. It’s like my baby. I’d need assurances that it was going to a good home.

Discuss